PFiddlesoft logo
Home Overview Features Screenshots Store Press Support

 

PFiddle Collection logo

The PFiddle Collection

PFeatures

Pointer Noodge Instructions

Applidude Instructions

Waccy Accy Instructions


Pointer Noodge icon

Pointer Noodge instructions

The third PFiddle in the PFiddlesoft Collection is Pointer Noodge. Pointer Noodge slows down the system pointer, removing mouse, trackpad and trackball acceleration so you can place the pointer exactly where you want it in any application. You can also nudge the pointer one pixel at a time horizontally and vertically using the arrow keys. Hold down the backslash (\) key to drag. Hold down the right bracket (]) key to speed up the pointer temporarily.

Open Pointer Noodge's Preferences window to turn off pointer control and to turn on other features. Other features include rotating images to help you find the pointer on the screen, a border and highlighting to identify the window, drawer or sheet under the pointer, a text box and optional speech providing the pointer's coordinates and information about the application under the pointer, and a spotlight effect for presentations. Pointer Noodge makes it easier for everybody to use the computer, including users with impaired vision or motor control issues.

Select "Start Pointer Noodge at login" in Pointer Noodge's Preferences window to run Pointer Noodge all the time. To open the Preferences window and use Pointer Noodge's menus, make it the active application by clicking its Dock icon or pressing Command-Tab to bring up the application switcher. To make all of Pointer Noodge's features available, enable access for assistive devices in the Pointer Noodge application menu.

Pointer Noodge does nothing until you turn on Nudge Mode. Toggle Nudge Mode on and off with the Nudge Mode hot key (Control-Option-Shift-N by default), or jiggle the pointer from side to side rapidly. You can also toggle it on and off in the Pointer Noodge Application or Dock menu. When Nudge Mode is on, a badge with the letter "N" appears on the Dock icon.

For detailed instructions and more information, launch Pointer Noodge and choose Help > Pointer Noodge Help. You can also view the Pointer Noodge video with a compatible browser and Pointer Noodge screenshots


Applidude icon

Applidude instructions

The first PFiddle in the PFiddlesoft Collection is Applidude. Applidude floats over your screen and reminds you which application is currently active.

For detailed instructions and more information, launch Applidude and choose Help > Applidude Help. You can also view the Applidude video with a compatible browser and Applidude screenshots

Launch Applidude

Launch Applidude the same way you launch most Macintosh applications: double-click its icon in the Finder. If you're like most people, you installed it in the local Applications folder or the Utilities subfolder.

To avoid having to perform this simple task in the future, add Applidude to your Login Items list by dragging it into the Accounts pane of System Preferences. Easier still, open Applidude's Preferences window and select the "Start Applidude at login" setting.

We've made even this task easy by doing it for you! Applidude comes with the "Start Applidude at login" setting turned on by default. The first time you launch Applidude, Applidude automatically adds itself to your Login Items list. If you don't want Applidude to launch automatically every time you log in, just turn off the "Start Applidude at login" setting in Applidude's Preferences window, or use the Remove (-) button in the Login Items list in the Accounts pane in System Preferences.

When "Start Applidude at login" is set in Applidude, it takes precedence over the Login Items list in System Preferences. If you launch Applidude manually while this preference is set, Applidude adds itself to the Login Items list even if you previously removed it. The only way to be sure Applidude does not launch automatically at login is to turn off this preference in Applidude.

Select the Applidude window

When Applidude itself is the active, or frontmost, application, you can select it the same way you select most applications' windows: click the window. This is particularly easy with Applidude, because the entire window is clickable.

But this only works when Applidude is active. When some other application is active, Applidude's window turns into a ghost. It's still there, and you can see it floating above other applications' windows. But it has become semi-transparent, and when you try to click on it, your clicks pass through to the application underneath. This is great, because it lets you work on the application underneath without having to move Applidude's window. But since you can't click the window, how can you move it if you want to? And how can you get at Applidude's menus?

The answer is just what you would expect. Select Applidude's window the same way you select any application's active window: Click the Applidude icon in the Dock. Or—if you want to know why the Applidude window looks the way it does—press Command-Tab to bring up the application switcher, and keep pressing Command-Tab until the Applidude icon is highlighted and then let go.

Move the Applidude window

The Applidude window opens by default in the bottom-right corner of your main screen. You can always see it because it floats over other applications' windows. But it doesn't get in your way most of the time because it is usually transparent and you can click through it, or it moves out of your way automatically.

To move the window to a new default location, just bring Applidude to the front by clicking its icon in the Dock or pressing Command-Tab to bring up the application switcher. While Applidude is frontmost, it doesn't move out of your way and you can click it. Then you can drag Applidude's window somewhere else, and it will remember its new location until you move it again.

While Applidude is frontmost, you can also use its menus to open its Preferences window, read its Help book, or quit.

Because Applidude remembers where you left the window next time it launches, we didn't have to put a setting in the Preferences window for the preferred location.

Set Applidude preferences

Preference settings allow you to add Applidude to your Login Items list in the Accounts pane of System Preferences so it launches automatically at login, or remove it from the list; to turn on Applidude's spoken announcements when a new application becomes active, or silence it; to display agent applications, or ignore them; to cause the Applidude window to move out of the way of the mouse pointer automatically, or leave it in place; and to hide the Applidude window up to 60 seconds after a new application becomes active, or leave it visible all the time.

To open Applidude's Preferences window, bring Applidude to the front by clicking its icon in the Dock or pressing Command-Tab to bring up the application switcher. Then you can use Applidude's menus to open its Preferences window, and also to read its Help book or quit.

By default, Applidude is added to your Login Items list the first time you launch it; it speaks the name of every newly activated application using your default system voice setting; it displays agent applications; it moves its window out of the way of the mouse pointer automatically; and it hides its window ten seconds after you switch applications


Waccy Accy icon

Waccy Accy instructions

The second PFiddle in the PFiddlesoft Collection is Waccy Accy. Waccy Accy is a game based on the Accessibility API that is pfun for all users, including those with impaired vision. The more you play Waccy Accy, the more familiar you will become with where things are on your desktop.

For detailed instructions and more information, launch Waccy Accy and choose Help > Waccy Accy Help. You can also view the Waccy Accy video with a compatible browser and Waccy Accy screenshots.

Play Waccy Accy

To win Waccy Accy, reveal your full user name by flipping the placards displaying placeholders so they show their hidden characters. You are playing against the clock, and your best time will be recorded for posterity.

You can't type your name on the keyboard. Instead, move the mouse over text elements on the screen. The first matching character in the title of any eligible UI element counts. Don't waste time clicking it, though. As soon as you mouse over it, the corresponding placard flips to display that character. UI elements in Waccy Accy's own windows are out of bounds.

Be quick. Placards flip back to the placeholder side as time goes by, and they flip back faster if you have a shorter user name. It's hard to make up for a lost character, because once you use a UI element, it's dead — you can't use it again. Worse yet, if you click the mouse or use keyboard shortcuts to reveal more UI elements, all the placards flip back to the placeholder side as a penalty and you have to start over. And don't be too quick, or you'll pass over a UI element before there's time to read it. Whew!!! This is harder than it sounds!

To read these instructions again at any time, open the Waccy Accy Help book or click the Instructions button on the game board.

Set Waccy Accy Settings

Waccy Accy doesn't have a Preferences menu like most applications. Instead, set the game's basic settings by clicking the Settings button on the game board. In the Settings window you can choose to play Waccy Accy silently or with distinctive sounds that mark the progress of the game, but you will have a much more enjoyable experience if you choose Speech. You can control the speed of spoken feedback using a slider.

Turn On Waccy Accy Cheats

A game isn't really a game without cheats, and Waccy Accy has its fair share of them. Read about them and, if you have no shame, take advantage of them by clicking the Cheats button on the game board. Naturally, if you cheat your score will not be recorded in the Best Time record.


This page was first published by PFiddlesoft on October 24, 2010. Last updated April 15, 2014.
Copyright © 2010-2014 Bill Cheeseman. Used by permission. All Rights Reserved.
PFiddlesoft, PFiddle Software, pfiddle, pfiddles, the PFiddlesoft logo, Applidude, Waccy Accy and Pointer Noodge are trademarks of PreForm Assistive Technologies, LLC.